Resurrection? Paul Mutora regained consciousness and began calling for help hours after having been pronounced dead

Resurrection? Paul Mutora regained consciousness and  began calling for help hours after having been pronounced dead


  • 24-year-old man from central Kenya was  rushed to hospital
  • He had drunk insecticide in an apparent  suicide attempt
  • Pronounced dead, he was taken to the  morgue to be embalmed
  • The anti-poison drugs may have made him  appear to have died
  • Hospital is investigating how the mistake  could have happened         By  Abigail Frymann

 

Staff in a Kenyan morgue were shocked when a  man who had been pronounced dead regained consciousness and began calling for  help.

Hospital authorities have launched an  investigation into why Paul Mutora, 24, was declared dead and his body taken to a morgue for embalming.

He had been rushed to the hospital in a  critical condition after drinking insecticide in an apparent suicide  attempt  following an argument with his father.

On Thursday afternoon two mortuary  attendants heard noises coming from a side room and when they found the  man  breathing, they ‘took to their heals screaming,’ a witness told  Kenya’s Star  newspaper.

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Mr Mutora, a married father-of-one from  the  town of Limuru, had been taken 30 miles to Naivasha District Hospital, 55 miles  north-east of Nairobi.

On  Wednesday his condition deteriorated and he was pronounced dead at around 11pm  and taken to the morgue. 

 

Mr Mutora’s father and other relatives  visited his body at the morgue on Thursday morning and returned home to  start  making arrangements for his funeral.

After  his shock recovery, Mr Mutora was taken  back to the hospital’s male ward and medics say he is now out of danger. 

Row: Paul Mutora and his father (pictured) fell out before the 24-year-old drank insecticide in an apparent suicide bid


Row: Paul Mutora and his father (pictured) fell out  before the 24-year-old drank insecticide in an apparent suicide bid

Hospital superintendent Dr Joseph Mburu  told  television network KTN Kenya that the anti-poison drugs given to Mr Mutora upon  arrival at the hospital may have wrongly given the  impression he had died. 

He  said: ‘The effect of atropines can be sometimes to slowing of heart rate and  most of the time it causes dilation of the pupils. 

‘These two observations are used to make a  conclusion that someone has lost their life,’ he said.

A groggy Mr Mutora said: ‘This was a mistake  from the start. 

Investigation: Dr Joseph Mburu said the hospital would investigate how such a mistake could have happened, but he suggested a colleague had misunderstood how Mr Mutora would respond to the drugs given to him

Investigation: Dr Joseph Mburu said the hospital would  investigate how such a mistake could have happened, but he suggested a colleague  had misunderstood how Mr Mutora would respond to the drugs given to  him

‘I apologise to my father as I prepare to go  and take care of my wife and child.’ 

Several family members blamed the hospital  for being careless. Dr Mburu said the hospital was investigating how the wrong  diagnosis had occurred. 

He told KTN ‘the person who was working in  that ward seems not to have understood the effect of some of the drugs which I  used’ to treat Mr Mutora’s poisoning.


 

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